Friday, June 23, 2017

Top Five Ways to Work Less and Enjoy Life More

Everything today is about "more": more money, more time, more pressure, and ultimately, more stress. However, does this rat-race life leave you feeling flat and defeated and constantly chasing an ideal you're no longer sure exists? If this sounds like you, it's probably time to downshift and find ways to work less and truly enjoy your life more. Working less sounds like a scary prospect, but once you see how achievable it is and how much peace it will return to your life, you will be sold!



1. Make Changes at Work



We often get caught up in the tidal wave of rushing to get to the next level at work. So caught up, in fact, that we don't realize we are no longer enjoying the work that we do and aren't even sure that we're adding value. How do you make an honest shift towards happiness while not letting down your co-workers or your boss, and continuing to pay your bills? Fortunately, there are more options available than ever before. There are simple steps that you can take such as walking at lunch as a way to get away from your desk or more drastic options such as requesting a lower-stress (and likely lower-paid) position. However, there are some great middle ground opportunities at businesses today as long as you get creative. Have you ever considered flex time? More than ever, organizations are allowing their employees to work one day a week from home or create a more flexible schedule that doesn't inconvenience office mates or negatively impact work.



2. Pick Your Battles



Think of everything that you need or want to accomplish in the next five years. Maybe it's saving up for a big trip, or getting that huge promotion you've had your heart set on. Physically write down what is most important to you in the short-term and the long-term, and those are the things that you don't want to compromise on. Everything else is up for negotiation. If a short jaunt with friends comes up that will require you to skip a vacation day with family later in the year, just say no! The same goes for things like eating out on a weekly basis. The costs associated with feeding a family of three or four outside the home can really mount up, and keep you from reaching longer-term goals for a short-term convenience. This trade-off may not be worth it and may cause you to have to work overtime to support your fast-food habits.



3. Stop Multitasking



Taking the time to focus on one topic at a time truly does pay off. While multitasking feels efficient, a recent study at Stanford University showed how productivity can plummet when your brain attempts to focus on more than one thing at the same time. Instead, be intentional about what you need to accomplish -- focus, complete the task, and then move on.



4. Automate Your Savings



Ever find it difficult to get enough money together at the end of each month for savings? If so, it's time to outsmart yourself! Even if it's only ten to twenty dollars per week, start sending a small chunk of change from each paycheck to a savings account that you can't easily access, and do it automatically. The theory being that if you never see the money, you'll never miss it. Before you know it, you'll be able to buy something you've really wanted without having to work overtime or take on extra shifts to make it happen.



5. Get Motivated



Sometimes, the way to do your best work is simply to have fun! When you are energized and enjoying what you do, work just comes more naturally. Creative juices flow, relationships with co-workers have more synergy, and life is good. When you're at work, look for ways to enjoy it! The positive mood will spill over into your personal life, and you'll find yourself enjoying life more every day.



These are just a few of the ways you can find more peace and joy in your daily life, simply by finding the balance between hard work and hard play. Multitask less, focus more, and bring fun to everything you do!


Tuesday, May 30, 2017

The "Foot in the Door" Technique

Nobody questions the value of getting "a foot in the door." We all strive at one point or another to get a foot in the door with an employer, an institution of higher learning, or even a romantic relationship.



As a marketer, however, your interest in getting a foot in the door is more likely with your customers and a hopeful precursor to a big sale! A salesman who gets a foot in the door by getting customers to agree to a small initial request will undoubtedly find greater success with larger requests (think major sales $$!) down the line.



Freedman and Fraser's Compliance Experiment



One of the first studies to scientifically investigate the "foot in the door" phenomenon was the 1966 compliance experiment by Jonathan L. Freedman and Scott C. Fraser. This experiment took place in two independent phases that used different approaches and test subjects. Because these studies were conducted on weekdays during the more conservative 1960s, the vast majority of test subjects were housewives.



The first Freedman and Fraser study divided 156 subjects into two basic groups. Both of these groups were telephoned by researchers who pretended to be from the consumer goods industry. One of the groups was contacted only once with a relatively large request. The other group was contacted twice, first with an initial small request and then with the much larger second request. In this case, the small request was to simply answer a few questions about kitchen products while the larger request, which came three days after the small request, was to allow someone to come into the home and catalog the contents of all their cabinets.



The second study essentially followed the same template as the first, but used the posting of a small and discrete window sign as its small request and the installation of a large and unattractive yard billboard as its large request.



The Effectiveness of the "Foot in the Door" Technique



The results of the Freedman and Fraser experiment were quite revealing. In the kitchen products study, subjects who agreed to the small first request were more than twice as likely to comply with the large second request. The results of second study backed up those of the first with significantly more people agreeing to place an eyesore of a billboard in their yard after previously agreeing to place a small sign in the window of their home or automobile. Perhaps most surprising, it did not even seem to matter that the promotional social message of the small sign (keeping California clean) was entirely different from that of the gaudy billboard (driving safely).



Modern Marketing Implications



The use of the phrase "a foot in the door" usually conjures images of the old fashioned door-to-door salesman who manages to wedge his wingtips against the doorjamb of your entryway after you answer your doorbell. And we all know that after he gets his foot in the door (or gets you to agree to a small initial request), he will undoubtedly try to make his way into your house (or get you to agree to a much larger second request).



But how does this sales technique work in the modern marketing landscape? In short, it's all about calls-to-action (CTAs).



Call Them into Action



If you are distributing printed material that ends with a CTA, you may want to consider how far to push your customer base with your initial request. Don't scare away a potential sale by asking too much too soon.



You can wait a bit for that big sale if it means building a comfortable and lasting rapport with your customers. Consider closing your marketing materials with a modest request or CTA and gain compliance for a big future payday!


Friday, May 19, 2017

AR, VR, and Other Ways to Use Technology in a Print Campaign

From the affordable headsets that take users into another setting or world via virtual reality to games like Pok?mon Go and even children's coloring pages, technology is impacting the way we live and seek out entertainment. It may seem like virtual or augmented reality is firmly fixed in the digital world (and therefore of no interest to those who create and use printed pieces), but a surprising amount of technology can be incorporated into printed media.



Augmented Reality and Printing



Augmented reality technology provides an overly to the "real world" you can see via your phone's camera, adding digital elements to the space around you. Pok?mon GO is the best recent example of AR in action, and retailers like IKEA also use it to allow you to see what furniture pieces would look like in your own home.



Adding AR elements to your printed pieces gives people a whole new way to interact with your postcards, business cards, catalogs, and more. It also adds an element of fun and makes it more likely that the recipient of the piece will want to hang onto it and even show it off.



While not everyone will "get" AR right away, recent hits like Pok?mon Go show that AR can be accepted by a wide group of ages and demographics. From including an interactive game in your materials (as Toys R Us did in a recent catalog) to using a playful mascot or other element, creative use of AR can help your printed piece make a splash in the real world.



QR Codes



Those little square barcodes are an ideal match for printed pieces and can bring visitors to your site. Since QR codes are designed to be read with a smartphone, you give the person holding your printed material the ability to visit your site in an instant. Use a QR code on your printed piece to link to a special offer, unlock content, or even provide additional information. QR codes are small and won't take up much space on your printed materials, and incorporating one allows your prospects and recipients to interact with your business in a whole new way.



QR Codes and Virtual Reality



Immerse your reader in your printed materials by providing a QR code that links the viewer to a virtual reality experience or unlocks additional content. If you already have a VR showroom, game, or content, then making it easy for users to access it by simply scanning a QR code ensures you get plenty of extra traffic, without taking up space on your materials.



Variable Data Printing



This type of technology won't change the look of your printed pieces, but it can help personalize the materials you create. Your customer won't notice anything special about the printing, but they will think you're really in tune with what they want and need.



The ability to create on-demand pieces that match your customer's preferences boosts the likelihood that your offer will resonate with them. Used primarily in direct mail, but adaptable to other pieces, variable data printing allows you to target the elements used in a specific piece to the intended recipient. This technology is particularly useful for targeted marketing campaigns with a personal touch.



Adding a dash of high tech to your printed materials gives you additional ways to connect with customers and helps you get the most from your printing investment. Your pieces are also more likely to start a conversation, grab attention, and even be saved by the recipient, boosting their long-term value and ensuring your brand is remembered when your prospect needs something.


Tuesday, May 16, 2017

What You Need to Know About Color in Design

In a recent study conducted by KissMetrics.com, visual appearance and color ranked more important to consumers than just about everything else when viewing marketing materials. In fact, ninety-three percent of people who responded to the survey said that visual appearance (which color is a part of) was the most important factor they used when making a purchasing decision. Only six percent said texture, while on percent placed a heavy value on sound and smell.



Color and Marketing: Breaking it Down



Along these same lines, an incredible eighty-five percent of consumers said that color was THE primary reason why they chose to buy a particular product or service. It goes without saying that the right color design is the perfect place to start with your marketing materials.



In terms of your long-term success, one of the most valuable resources that you have available to you is and will always be your brand. It's something that lives on long after a purchase is made. It's the narrative and the set of strong, relatable values that are at the heart of your business. Additional studies have shown that the careful use of color can increase brand recognition by up to eighty percent, which, in turn, goes a long way towards increasing consumer confidence at the same time.



But What Do Colors Mean?



However, none of this is to say that your marketing materials should be jam-packed with as many colors as possible. Quite the contrary, in fact. Different colors have all been known to affect people on an emotional and psychological level in a variety of ways. Consider the following:



  • Yellow is often associated with optimism and youthful enthusiasm. This is why it's often used to grab the attention of people like window shoppers.

  • Red is almost always associated with a sense of energy and excitement. In fact, red is a great way to create a sense of urgency in your readers (and when used right can even increase their heart rate, too!)

  • Black is considered to be very powerful and very sleek, which is why it is usually used to market luxury products.

  • Green is normally associated with wealth - which makes perfect sense because money is green. It also happens to be the easiest color for the human eyes to process, which is why green is often used to underline important information in marketing copy.

To that end, it's important to use different colors depending on exactly what it is you're trying to accomplish. Are you trying to highlight an upcoming clearance sale and want to create a sense of urgency? Make sure those fliers and posters have as much red on them as possible. Are you trying to attract the attention of a more sophisticated level of clientele, or do you want to positively influence the overall impression that people get when they see your products? Try using as much black as you can.



Color is a powerful tool when used correctly, but it's important to remember that it is just one of many. But, provided your use of color matches up with both your audience and your long-term objectives, you'll find that it can be a terrific way to put your campaigns over the top and start generating the types of results you deserve.


Tuesday, May 9, 2017

How to Live Your Passion in Any Profession




We all want to live a purposeful life. Some individuals are lucky enough to be in a professional role that allows them to live out their passion through their profession. Even if you aren't able to make money while at the same time living your passion, you can still integrate your passion in your current profession. After all, "Often finding meaning in life is not about doing things differently; it is about seeing familiar things in new ways," says author Rachel Naomi Remen. More on this below:



Understand You Don't Have to Change Careers:



No matter what your current profession might be, you have the propensity to make a difference and live your passion. This means, living your passion doesn't have to include a career move. Not everyone can get a job that embodies their passion. That's why it's good to "bloom where you're planted" so to speak. Whatever your profession, find ways to live your passion within it. The following are a few ways to do that:



Treat People Like They Matter:



To live a life of purpose, you should treat those around you like they matter. For example, a cafeteria worker might feel her job doesn't matter. Yet, what if while doing her job, she gives kids the only kind words and the most genuine smile they will get each day? Doesn't that make her job of serving food more purposeful? Another example could include a handyman that takes the time to talk to the widow whose house he is repairing. It might not seem like much to the man, but to the lonely widow who was yearning for company, it can make a great difference. In the service industry, each customer served is another opportunity to make a difference.



Volunteer Your Time To Causes You Believe In:



If your nine to five job isn't world-changing, that doesn't mean you can't still make a difference and live out your passion. Find organizations that are addressing the areas you feel need attention. Join their cause through volunteering your time. If possible, you can find ways to combine your day job with your volunteer efforts. For example, let's say you work in an office and you want to give back to kids who have cancer. Ask your co-workers to make donations along with you. Organize a visit to a local hospital and take gifts to the kids. Make baked goods, sell them to your co-workers, and then give the proceeds to the organization. You could also take part in a run that benefits the cause and ask your co-workers to join in. The main thing to remember is you don't have to keep your passion and your profession separate. In fact, many businesses are more than willing to give back to worthy organizations. It's good PR, and they can write it off on their taxes.



Don't Give Up:



Above all else, to live a life of passion and purpose, you can't give up. Even if things haven't worked out exactly as you would have planned, you can still live a life that changes the world. Of course, this doesn't mean you have to remain in the same career, but you shouldn't feel the only way to live a life of passion is to change your profession.



Friday, May 5, 2017

Avoid These Common Print Marketing Mistakes for Visually Compelling Content

Compelling images are the perfect way to attract attention and create an emotional connection with your customers and prospects. Avoid these common mistakes as you design newer and richer content moving forward.



Mistake #1: You Didn't Keep It Simple



Why do you think audiences have gravitated towards visual print marketing content over the last few years? If you thought "because people are bombarded with information these days from nearly every angle," you'd be right! From the moment people wake up in the morning, their smartphones are sending them emails and push notifications. They're wading through dozens of blog posts. They're reading massive reports at work all day long. Information is everywhere, and it can often feel overwhelming.



Solution: Make your print marketing visually impactful, and easy to read and interpret.



Visual print marketing is an excellent way to relieve people from these stresses - or at least; it's supposed to be. It can allow you to take your message and wrap it up in a way that is easy to understand and a refreshing change of pace from everything else.



Think about it in terms of infographics. Infographics are an incredibly popular form of visual content because they take complicated ideas and break them down to just what you need to know and nothing more. Apply this same concept to your print marketing designs.



Mistake #2: You Failed to Account For Light



When you're leaning so heavily on your visuals, you MUST account for the number one factor that can destroy the feeling you were going for - light.



How that gorgeous new flyer or banner you're creating looks on a computer screen and how it looks in a store window in your neighborhood can be very, very different depending on the lighting quality of the area, the direction of the sun, and more.



Solution: Ask yourself how light will affect every decision you make, from the richness of the colors you're choosing to the specific type of paper (and finish) you'll be using.



Accounting for these simple mistakes will put you ahead of the game and on your way to stunning and compelling visual print marketing.


Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Don't Fear Your Marketing Competitors. Learn From Them

Regardless of the products you're trying to market, the audience you're trying to cater to, or the industry you happen to be operating in, all businesses face competition. This is just a fact of life. But it's important to realize that a competitor isn't just another company that is trying to go after the same pool of customers that you are. Competitors are invaluable learning opportunities that are just waiting to be taken advantage of, provided you approach things from the right angle.



Learn About Your Audience



One of the most important lessons that you can learn by taking a closer look at your marketing competitors has nothing to do with your competition itself and everything to do with the shared audience you're both going after. For the sake of argument, let's say that your number one competitor offers products or services that are very similar to yours.



How is your competition marketing those products and services to that audience? What types of print materials are they designing? What tone do they use when speaking to them directly? What prices do they charge, and why do they feel like the market can sustain that? What values do they choose to single in on when representing their brand?



All of these choices, along with the public reaction to them, can tell you a great deal about what your audience is looking for. Marketing is all about making a connection, and if you can pick up something through observation that you can adapt and make your own to strengthen that connection, you should absolutely take that opportunity.



Learn About the Competitors Themselves



The second lesson you can learn by taking a closer look at your marketing competitors comes down to how they choose to run a business that is very similar to yours in many ways. This goes beyond just the products or services they provide. Look at how they choose to distribute and deliver those products. Look at the steps they take to enhance customer value or build loyalty. Have they recently instituted a rewards program with great success? If you were thinking about doing one yourself, congratulations, someone else just did your trial run for you.



Perhaps the most important thing you should be watching out for when it comes to your marketing competitors is how they react when they make a mistake. These days, everything is essentially an extension of your marketing arm - from the print collateral you're putting out into the world to customer service interactions on a site like Facebook. Everything is taking place in the public space, which means that other customers (and you and your associates) can all see everything go down in real-time.



Did your biggest competitor have a particularly nasty public interaction with a customer? What factors caused it to occur in the first place? How did the customer react? How did the business react? What did the rest of the audience have to say at the end of the day? Remember that mistakes are only a bad thing if you choose not to learn from them. If you can get someone else to make a mistake and arrive at the same lesson, you come out all the better for it.



Competition in the world of business (and especially regarding marketing) isn't going away anytime soon. However, it's not something you should let get you down. Instead, look at it for what it is: an incredible ongoing education into your market, your industry, and even your own business that someone else is paying for.